Galilean School

Galilean School

The University of Padova has a century-old tradition of promoting the excellence of young students, whatever their nationality, gender, beliefs, or fields of interest. The Galilean School of Higher Education, a program of excellence for gifted students, was born in order to improve this tradition. The School has been named in honour of Galileo Galilei, the founder of modern Physics and Astronomy, who came to Padova in 1592, when he was 28 years old; the college where the School is hosted, Collegio Morgagni, takes its name from Giovanni Battista Morgagni, one of the founders of modern Medicine, who came to Padova in 1711, when he was 29 years old. Both these remarkable men shared a great passion for all activities of the human mind, across a broad range of disciplines including literature, music, natural sciences. Such passion for excellence and a broad vision have deeply been rooted in the University of Padova throughout its history. Furthermore, Padova has been recently evaluated the best of the large Italian Universities for quality of research. The Galilean School is an extraordinary opportunity, offered to the most talented students at the University of Padova. It provides a blend of traditional university education with additional seminars and lectures, given by internationally-renowned visiting professors and researchers. The main objective of the School is to enforce the cross-disciplinary education of its students, by combining learning modalities and fields. The School is divided into three branches: Humanities, Social Sciences and Natural Sciences. Each branch has its own interdisciplinary courses, which run alongside conferences, workshops, laboratories, seminars and field trips for students.

Galilean School

Galilean School

The University of Padova has a century-old tradition of promoting the excellence of young students, whatever their nationality, gender, beliefs, or fields of interest. The Galilean School of Higher Education, a program of excellence for gifted students, was born in order to improve this tradition. The School has been named in honour of Galileo Galilei, the founder of modern Physics and Astronomy, who came to Padova in 1592, when he was 28 years old; the college where the School is hosted, Collegio Morgagni, takes its name from Giovanni Battista Morgagni, one of the founders of modern Medicine, who came to Padova in 1711, when he was 29 years old. Both these remarkable men shared a great passion for all activities of the human mind, across a broad range of disciplines including literature, music, natural sciences. Such passion for excellence and a broad vision have deeply been rooted in the University of Padova throughout its history. Furthermore, Padova has been recently evaluated the best of the large Italian Universities for quality of research. The Galilean School is an extraordinary opportunity, offered to the most talented students at the University of Padova. It provides a blend of traditional university education with additional seminars and lectures, given by internationally-renowned visiting professors and researchers. The main objective of the School is to enforce the cross-disciplinary education of its students, by combining learning modalities and fields. The School is divided into three branches: Humanities, Social Sciences and Natural Sciences. Each branch has its own interdisciplinary courses, which run alongside conferences, workshops, laboratories, seminars and field trips for students.